Memory of the Dead – Argentina, 2011

Memory of the Dead is a 2011 Argentinian horror feature film directed by Valentín Javier Diment (The Owner) from a screenplay co-written with Martín Blousson, Nicanor Loreti and Germán Val. The movie stars Horacio Acosta, Raquel Albéniz, Jimena Anganuzzi and Lola Berthet.

Plot:

Following the sudden death of her husband, Alicia assembles all his friends at a vast country manor for a reading of his final letter. However, Alicia also has other plans in mind – helping her husband return from the grave with a spell that will put all of the gathered guests in mortal danger…

Reviews [may contain spoilers]:

“The proscenium arch peeks through its ripped black fishnets in practically every scene. Press materials frame Memory of the Dead as homage to the highly theatrical Dario Argento giallos of the 1960s and ‘70s. But that feels more like a justification for the film’s overt cheapness than any legitimate artistic intent.” Matt Warren, Battleship Pretension

For those looking for where Memory of the Dead fits in as a genre piece, I think it close in spirit to some of the films of Nobuhiko Obayashi, particularly Hausu and The Discarnates, as well as the earlier films of Peter Jackson and Sam Raimi (and I am hardy the first to note the similarities with the latter two filmmakers).” Peter Nellhaus, Coffee Coffee and More Coffee

“The movie wants us to be shocked by the twist ending, but by that point, most viewers will have long since been done with the movie. Memory of the Dead may sound titillating on the surface, as it offers some gore, some nudity, and one “how did they do that?” moment, but, in the end, the movie is boring…” Mike Long, DVD Sleuth

“It all leads up to a decent twist ending that wraps up the core plot in an unexpected way. Nicely shot and filled with some seriously slick camera work and set pieces, Memory of the Dead manages to pull from its influences and at the same time craft something fairly unconventional.” Ian Jane, DVD Talk

“Fans of darkly humorous splatterfests like Evil Dead II and Dead Alive will find plenty to love about Memory of the Dead, although they may be turned off by the lucid narrative. Conversely, foreign and independent film enthusiasts will appreciate the moody, artistic filmmaking approach but may not enjoy the sillier moments.” Alex DiVincenzo, iHorror

“The images conjured are demented and sopping with blood, the gore hounds will not be disappointed by the visceral experience but some might be a bit turned off (or maybe just confused) by the pervasive dream logic, the narrative can be a bit disjointed at times.” Ken Kastenhuber, McBastard’s Mausoleum

“It all dances on the razor’s edge threatening at any moment to spill over into mere kitsch but the screenplay, which keeps the characters confronted with a variety of personal sins and anxieties, gives a solid framework to an equally solid cast in making important moments seem heartfelt. If anything the humor makes some of the films darker observations easier to digest.” Dave Canfield, Screen Anarchy

“Argentinian horror movie that emphasizes disturbing imagery over plot coherence. Its approach to horror visuals is something like with A Nightmare on Elm Street, all nightmarish dream-logic, except without the wisecracks and driven by the characters’ traumatic pasts.”  The Worldwide Celluloid Massacre

More Argentinian horror

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