The Curse of the Crying Woman – Mexico, 1961

The Curse of the Crying Woman – original title: La maldición de la llorona is a 1961 Mexican supernatural horror feature film directed by Rafael Baledón (Swamp of the Lost Souls; The Hell of Frankenstein) from a screenplay by co-written with Fernando Galiana. Produced by actor Abel Salazar, it also stars Rosa Arenas, Abel Salazar, Rita Macedo, Carlos López Moctezuma and Enrique Lucero.

Amelia and Jaime, a married couple, travel to an old country house owned by Amelia’s aunt Selma, who practices black magic. Selma tries to use her niece in order to resurrect “la llorona” (the crying woman), an ancient spectre…

curse of the crying woman La maldición de la llorona

Reviews:

“It’s a rich but simple folklore yarn of witchcraft, curses and evil. With wonderful sets, interesting characters, and creative effects, the sinister mood will keep you mesmerized. If you love the black and white gothic horror of the 1960’s than you have to seek out this little gem from Mexico. Highly recommended!” Goregirl’s Dungeon

“The classy B&W photography, the bats on strings, the dilapidated castle, the classy heroes and heroines, the creepy villains and even the disfigured monster that curiously comes into existence during the tail end of the film […] Despite its obvious weaknesses, The Curse of the Crying Woman is a childhood nightmare come to life.” Monsters At Play

“The house itself takes on a menacing role, a secluded mausoleum straight out of Poe’s Fall of the House of Usher, and its ultimate demise is nothing short of spectacular; even the studio-bound forest takes on the ever-present threat of death, as in another snapshot moment of Amelia surrounded by hundreds of eyes staring accusingly from the branches. All the elements are in place – bloodsucking beauties, bats in the bell tower, the Thing in the attic, and those black, black eyes – for a bona fide masterpiece of Mexican horror.” Andrew Leavold, Schlock Treatment

” …comes with some exceptionally unnerving special effects: haunted mirrors, decaying not-quite-dead bodies, Macedo’s gobsmacking entrance through a window and a wonderful series of shots featuring satanic rituals, shot with negative film stock – think Benjamin Christensen meets Italian Gothic.” Steve Langton, The Spinning Image

“Her eye movements in overdrive, Macedo positively chews the scenery as possessed Aunt Selma, giving us more than our money’s worth […] But amidst all the creaky door theatrics, midnight hocus pocus, and cobwebby fun, who really cares? Just dim the candles, whip up a margarita, and enjoy.” The Terror Trap

The Curse of the Crying Woman is simply one of the best things to come out of Mexico since the chimichanga. It’s got everything from eyeless witches to bloodthirsty dogs to hunchbacked bug-eyed mutants in it and actually has a number of effective jump scares too.” Mitch Lovell, The Video Vacuum

Related:

Mexican horror

Image credits: Zombos’ Closet

Quick links to HORRORPEDIA contents:

A | B | C | D | E  | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z



Categories: 1960s, Mexican, supernatural

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

%d bloggers like this: