Die Sister, Die! – USA, 1972


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‘Go ahead and scream Amanda it can’t help you now!’

Die Sister, Die!  – aka Die Sister Die – is a 1972 American horror feature film produced and directed by Randall Hood (writer of Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode ‘Final Escape’) from a screenplay by Tony Sawyer; it stars Jack Ging, Edith Atwater, Antoinette Bower and Kent Smith.

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Edward is tired of the “allowance” granted him by his sister, Amanda and becomes impatient for her death, and his inheritance. To hasten her demise, or at least stop her suicides from being thwarted, Edward hires a discredited ex-nurse, Esther to watch over her.

 

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Esther is less than enthusiastic about killing the old woman, though, and is curious about the secrets held in the house, including a mysterious third sister, Nell…

Reviews:

“This one isn’t a masterpiece either, but it is drenched in a strange atmosphere aided by some Corman-style nightmare sequences (lots of wacky lenses, severed limbs, and a runaway pet bird) and some fun Italian-style colourful lighting during moments of high tension … rumour has it this was originally supposed to be a made-for-TV project (which seems believable given the limited track record of director Randall Hood), but apparently the (still mild) violent content pushed it over to the big screen instead.” Mondo Digital

” …viewers might slot this one in with other (admittedly more interesting) seventies “California Gothic” flicks like House of Terror, Blood Mania, and Picture Mommy Dead in its combination of gothic trappings of old dark houses and familial madness with a murder plot. Lead Ging and Atwater try their best with the material […] but Bower is the dull side of the triangle when the direction of the drama should really hinge on her shifting loyalties…” Eric Cotenas, DVD Drive-In

“The superb acting, excellent locations, perfect build and classic twist ending makes Die Sister, Die! a must-see for horror fans young and old. It may not have the MTV-style crazy editing, or topless models getting slashed like most of us are used to, but it does contain several scenes guaranteed to chill you to the bone. It’s the kind of movie you want to watch late at night with a bowl of popcorn and all the lights off.” Retro Slashers

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Buy on DVD with Lurkers (1988): Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.com

“The fewer amount of faces on screen, the better. With a light cast, somewhat memorable and performance worthy, you never scram around the monitor marking off names as the dialogue passes from one to another. It’s simple, it’s kind of predictable, but it works! […] The freaky dreams were a major plus, and the visuals, short and sweet, worked wonders.” Oh, The Horror!

“Atwater does particularly well: it’s a role into which you can easily see Katherine Hepburn or Joan Crawford really sinking their teeth. Director Hood has an awful fondness for badly-shot flashbacks, however, which don’t just start and end with wavy lines, but utilise the effect for their entire duration. Keep the sea-sickness pills handy.” Trash City

“The level of professionalism here makes up for the lack of “action”present within Die Sister Die, yet the atmosphere and vibe surrounding the film is palpable throughout, keeping the viewer interested and invested in both the characters and story.” George Pacheco, 10K Bullets

“It’s slow paced, lacks thrills or scares, and is mostly devoid of drama.” Jeremy Biltz, DVD Talk

Main cast and characters:

Trivia:

A loose remake was made in 2013.

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DIE-SISTER-DIE

Wikipedia | IMDb

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Categories: 1970s

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