Things – USA, 1989

things 1989 movie poster

Things – stylized as THINGS – is a 1989 Canadian independent horror exploitation film (not to be confused with the 1993 American movie Things), written and produced by Andrew Jordan and Barry J. Gillis and directed by Jordan. 

Marking the mainstream film debut of adult movie star Amber Lynn, it has a cult following of fans who call themselves “Things-ites”. Some critics have argued that it might be “the worst film of all time.”

A man with a fanatical desire but inability to father children so forces his wife to undergo a dangerous experiment. This results in hatching a non-human life form in his wife’s womb, and the birth of a multitude of Things

Things Intervision DVD

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Reviews:

This is one of the most incomprehensible 85 minutes of film ever released, but the basic story involves two Canadian dicks (Barry J. Gillis as Don, Bruce Roach as Fred), who turn up at Don’s brother’s house for a few brews, only to find it seemingly empty.

After they have played a cassette tape of evil sounds and leafed through a book of (unseen) ritual atrocities – both of which they find in the fridge – brother Doug (Doug Bunston) turns up to explain that his wife is pregnant with mutant monsters that burst out of her stomach, the result of some dodgy fertility treatment by a Dr Lucas (Jan W. Pachul).

As these THINGS start to infest the house, the survivors do what anyone would do in such a situation – they sit around in the kitchen drinking and holding random conversations. Eventually, some stuff happens and some other people turn up and it all finally comes to a merciful end.

 

Shot on 8mm and post-dubbed later, Things is almost entirely incoherent. The editing is so spectacularly ham-fisted that it quickly becomes impossible to really follow what is happening – though for the most part, what is happening is ‘nothing’.

Instead, we get truly awful actors going through assorted mood swings, muttering and shouting nonsensical dialogue and occasional bursts of horror, all shot in what I assume is Dario Argento-inspired but badly executed swathes of red and blue.

The film lurches from moment to moment, at one point cutting in an unexplained and unconnected gory torture/mutilation scene, and the ‘action’ is punctuated with footage of adult movie star Amber Lynn as a reporter, reading out contradictory news reports about how the hapless pair have been missing for sixteen days or discovered safe and well, despite all the action taking place on one night and not ending well for most of the cast. Lynn reads her dialogue from a cue card that is positioned to her left, so her eye line is continually off. Yet she’s still the best performer here.

Things is riddled with movie references that are crowbarred in with a remarkable lack of finesse – The Evil DeadThe Last House on the Left, George Romero and Traci Lords all get name checked, and the THINGS are like a poor man’s Deadly Spawn.

The cast appear to be wasted, and that would certainly be an explanation for the post-production style too. This is the sort of film where someone will take his coat off and put it in the freezer and it doesn’t seem odd. It’s a film where the reaction to your sister-in-law giving birth to monsters is to sit around the kitchen chatting, and where we can spend five minutes watching the heroes looking at the ceiling. This, kids, is your brain on drugs. It’s an artistic abomination by any normal standards, and yet…

There are films that are bad, and films that are so bad they’re good. Things is neither – despite what some critics have said, this is just too slow, too incompetent and too confused to really work at a Bad Movie Night.

Rather, Things is a film that somehow moves beyond mere badness to become something of a fever-dream experience. It’s the only film I’ve seen that captures, however accidentally, the fractured, nonsensical nature of a nightmare.

The production style, the story and the lack of dramatic development actually suggest that all those involved were entirely unfamiliar with how movies work – it’s as if you’ve given a camera and several reels of film to people who had never actually seen a film before and told them to shoot a horror movie. As such, it becomes a curious slice of Outsider Art.

Undoubtedly dreadful by any conventional standards, yet clearly a very pure expression of creativity that remains utterly unique. You simply couldn’t make a film like this by trying to.

things 1989 murder

So while not exactly a rewarding experience, Things certainly deserves to be seen, if only to marvel at the sort of mind that would make such a film and subsequently decide it was good enough to actually show the world. And hell, Things got a 1989 VHS release and is now on a shiny new special edition DVD, so who’s had the last laugh?

David Flint, HORRORPEDIA

they came from within caelum vatnsdal canadian horror cinema

Buy: Amazon.ca | Amazon.com | Amazon.co.uk

Other reviews:

You like tormenting yourself with hilariously trashy, moronic, gory, idiotic bad films?? Things is the king of bad movies. This is the movie you put on when you have a get together of pals — and just blow them away. Trust me, you have never seen anything like this in your life. It’s absolutely astonishing in how it is able to mentally wreck anyone who watches it.” Robin Bougie, Cinema Sewer

” the worst movie I’ve ever seen. A movie so bad that you can’t help but love it – yes, I’m talking about 1989’s Things … It’s all a complete mess with something to do with a mousehole that leads to another dimension and Amber Lynn embarrassing herself more than Traci Lords in her first attempt at “legit” film – heck, there’s too much here to even start talking about it.” The Video Graveyard

Wikipedia | IMDb

 



Categories: 1980s, body horror, Canadian, Horrorpedia review, pregnancy horror

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