Dracula’s Daughter – USA, 1936

Dracula’s Daughter is a 1936 American vampire horror feature film produced by Universal Studios, and a loose sequel to the 1931 film Dracula. Directed by Lambert Hillyer from a screenplay by Garrett Fort, the film stars Otto Kruger, Gloria Holden, Marguerite Churchill and, as the only cast member to return from the original, Edward Van Sloan.

Countess Marya Zaleska is the daughter of Count Dracula and a vampire herself. Following Dracula’s death, she believes that by destroying his body she will be free of his influence and can live as a human.

When this fails, she turns to psychiatry and Dr. Jeffrey Garth. After his efforts fail, she kidnaps Janet, the woman Jeffrey loves, and flees with her to Transylvania in an attempt to bind Jeffrey to her…

Reviews:

“Dracula’s Daughter is a spooky little gem that goes heavy on the atmosphere. Though the cinematography and acting are both above par, I still think it’s more entertaining as a historical curiosity than as a horror film. There are definitely a lot of interesting subtextual implications to be read into the film, but if you’re not willing to put that much brain power into it, it’s kind of a slow creeper at best.” Garbo Laughs

“Dracula’s Daughter is without worth or interest. On the contrary, there are some genuinely original and imaginative touches here, but the film is guilty of continually undercutting itself, forcing even well-disposed viewers into the exasperating task of making allowances.” And You Call Yourself a Scientist!

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” … Universal was really too stuffy to put together a good shameless exploitation movie. Cynicism on this scale can create a fully enjoyable movie only when it produces exuberantly lurid trash, something Universal wouldn’t get a handle on making until the mid-to-late 1940’s. But as bad as it is, I must admit that Dracula’s Daughter has a certain dopey charm to it that its predecessor lacks.” Scott Ashlin, 1000 Misspent Hours and Counting

“Gloria Holden is extremely effective but can little headway against a poor script and totally unatmospheric, if pacy, direction by serials expert Lambert Hillyer.” Alan Frank, The Horror Film Handbook


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Categories: 1930s, vampire

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